Climate Change May Cause Iceberg, Double of NY, To Break the Antarctic Ice Shelf
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Climate Change May Cause Iceberg, Double of NY, To Break the Antarctic Ice Shelf

Climate Change has been causing problems as far as the melting of icebergs and glaciers around Antarctica are concerned. In a brand new finding by NASA, an iceberg that is the size of NY is all ready to break away from the ice shelf of Antarctica. NASA claims a crack had appeared along the Brunt ice shelf in October 2016 that is spreading over towards the east. The crack can also be known as the Halloween crack, also is likely to cross with another crack that has been stable for about 3.5 decades, but is now moving north in a light speed of around 2.5 miles per year.

It may occur in months, an iceberg of at least at least 660sq miles will break off. The procedure, which can be called calving, occurs naturally with ice packs; nevertheless, these changes are entirely unfamiliar in this region. NASA has warned that it could lead to destabilization of the Brunt ice cream leading to complete collapse as well. This could further accelerate ice at the glaciers, which may lead to an increased contribution to the sea level increase. When the other side of the Halloween Crack loses ice, instability will only increase. Even though this will be the biggest from the brunt ice cream in 10 decades, but it isn’t the very first time such an event is to occur.

NASA also says this iceberg wouldn’t make to the record of the 20 most massive icebergs in Antarctica. Also, in the year 2017 in July, icebergs of 2, 200sq miles had calved from the Larsen C ice shelf. These icebergs were more massive, double the size of the state of Delaware. Antarctic ice packs will play a significant role at global sea level increase from the future. UK and US scientists have claimed last year that Antarctica ice melt is in a breaking speed, which may lead to a significant threat to coastal towns. Iceberg calving though is natural, but because of climate change, ice shelves of Antarctica are thinning. Ice sheet melting has paced up 3 times than usual in the last five years. This may take a backseat if measures are taken to take a step to decrease greenhouse gas emissions and do something about global warming. From 2070, scientists say that melting ice in Antarctica should add more than 25cm to total global sea level increase.